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. SPORTS COMPLEX A sports complex is a group of sports facilities. For example, there are track and field stadiums, football stadiums, baseball stadiums, swimming pools, and gymnasiums. This area is a sports complex, for fitness. Olympic Park is a kind of Sports complex. The newly constructed Trivandrum International Stadium which bagged the award for the world's best new stadium is the largest Sports Compl
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  . SPORTS COMPLEX   A sports complex  is a group of sports facilies. For example, there are track and eld stadiums,football stadiums, baseball stadiums, swimming pools, and gymnasiums. This area is a sports complex,for tness. Olympic ark is a kind of !ports complex. The newly constructed Tri andrum #nternaonal !tadium which bagged the award for the world$s best new stadium is the largest !ports %omplex in #ndia.  SPACE REQUIREMENTS Main entrance The design of the entrance should be warm and welcoming. Theentrance foyer is the hub of the building and should havesufficient space and volume for people to circulate, view noticesor wait for friends in comfortable surroundings. Design toprovide:ã Views towards the sport hall and other main elements of thebuildingã Convenient and secure store for pushchairs overlooed fromreceptionã Draught lobby to the main entrance doorsã !utomatic operation of the main doors which is particularly helpfulto wheelchair users and people with young childrenã pace for the inclusion of security barriersThe management strategy will dictate foyer planning. #ptions forfoyer design include:ã reception close to the point of entry with sufficient space for$ueuingã an informal hotel type arrangement. %eception and office accommodation The reception des should:ã &e prominently sitedã &e of an open design with a dropped level for wheelchair users andchildren, but with sensitively designed security features asappropriateã 'ncorporate storage for lost property and items for sale or hireã Mae provision for the monitoring of fire and security systemsã !llow for the integration of CCTV, (! and other essential e$uipment)retrofitting such e$uipment when space is tight can be difficult*.#nly in dual+use schemes where club programming predominates is itappropriate for the open reception counter to be replaced with aglaed screen and counter to the staff office.The reception des and office accommodation should be closely lined.!n island reception counter may be used for larger centres to controlsports hall, pool, ice rin or spectator access. 'solated receptioncounters should be provided with an integral secure cash office.  ocial and viewing areas -here possible sports halls should be capable of being viewedfrom social accommodation and every hall with public use,including those on school sites, should have some social andrefreshment accommodation. The simplest answer is to etend thefoyer to include a seating area overlooing the hall throughsafety glaing fitted with blinds or a curtain to avoiddistracting badminton players or other user groups. Two or threevending machines with ad/acent storage are often sufficient forsmall halls but an alternative is to etend the reception counterfor staff to serve drins and snacs.'f a cafe area is included it should be:ã 0ocated in or close to the entrance foyer to enhance thewelcoming ambience and to enable the centre toã Designed to ensure that standards of decor match successfulhigh street e$uivalents.'n large centres social and viewing areas can be grouped together andmay include:ã ! bar and loungeã Viewing into the hall and other areas-here it is not possible to accommodate these facilities at groundfloor level, the social areas should be visible from the foyer andlined to it with a prominent staircase set in a generous well. 't isimportant that this relationship is emphasised and that the socialcontent is not tuced away in a remote corner of the building. upport accommodation will include:ã torage and servery areas serviced from a nearby vehicledelivery pointã (roper refuse storage and containment with direct accessã 'f there is a licensed area separate cellarage will be neededand a physical form of segregation may be re$uired.Viewing of sports halls and other activity areas provides addedinterest to the social content and assists in breaing down thecellular characteristics common to many older sports buildings. Thesebenefits have to be reconciled with the privacy needs of someoccupants so open galleries should be capable of being shut off andglaed screens must be fitted with curtains or blinds.  pectator seating 1 viewing 'n larger halls, bleacher seating can be integrated into thewall and lined up to a first floor access route. 'n smallerhalls smaller temporary seating units may be ept in the sportshall store. 'n all cases, the space re$uirements need to beconsidered in relationship to the court marings.Changing capacity Changing capacity should be provided to cope with thenormal maimum occupancy level and pattern of use.Calculations should tae into account:ã The number of badminton courts )2 players*  3 forchangeover. This number can be eceeded where there is schooluse and a need to provide for two or more classes. 4trachanging spaces will also be re$uired for single se activitiessuch as eep fit or aerobics.ã 5or small fitness e$uipment rooms changing spaces are often provided for each item of e$uipment )based on 6 m3 of floorarea* but for larger facilities this can be discounted by 36+789ã !erobics studios and other ancillary halls re$uire one spaceper 6+8 m3 and an allowance for overlap ã $uash courts re$uire four spaces per courtã The need to accommodate varying ratios of males1females withbuffer or individual changing units as re$uiredã Changing areas need to be fully accessible for disabledusersã 'deally, provide a proportion of cubicles for male andfemale customers who may prefer privacyã ;ave entrances that screen off views from circulation areaseg. privacy screening or lobbies.The design should allow a minimum of .< m3 per person with a 8.6m bench run for an accessible open group changing area and showerareas. More space will be re$uired where cubicles are provided orwhere dedicated disabled provision is incorporated in the generalarea.'f there is enough capacity the internal changing can also serveeternal pitches with an artificial playing surface, sub/ect to asuitable access route with hard paving and entrance matting. ;owever,grass pitches must have separate provision with direct access to andfrom the field and boot cleaning facilities.
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