Documents

4 pages
58 views

opioid epidemic chep 2

of 4
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Share
Description
To: Thomas E. Price, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services From: Mae Fountain, Health Service Administrator Relevant Chapters: Ch. 5 Date: November 9, 2017 Issue: Opioid Epidemic Opioid Epidemic Save lives, and put an end to the opioid epidemic! The opioid crisis is a very prevalent issue in the United States that needs to have serious action taken. Opioids killed almost 60,000 people in the United States last year. In
Transcript
  To: T homas E. Price, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services From: Mae Fountain, Health Service Administrator Relevant Chapters: Ch. 5 Date: November 9, 2017 Issue: Opioid Epidemic Opioid Epidemic Save lives, and put an end to the opioid epidemic! The opioid crisis is a very prevalent issue in the United States that needs to have serious action taken. Opioids killed almost 60,000  people in the United States last year. In this memo I will discuss what are opioids, what other countries have implemented to reduce the number of deaths, and propose a reform to end the opioid epidemic. Opioids are a type of drug used to relieve pain. Some commonly known opioids include  prescription drugs oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, and codeine. (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2016). Heroin is an illegal drug that is derived from prescription painkillers. Opioids are chemically designed to interact with receptors in our nerve cells (National Institute on Drug Abuse, 2016). Since not all opioids are illegal, doctors prescribe them to patients every day. When opioids are used responsibly they are very effective for patients with severe back pain or  post-surgery pain. The problem with opioids is they cause euphoria so people get addicted, and misuse the drug (NIDA, 2016). When opioids are taken in large quantities not prescribed by a doctor or when not needed for pain people have become dependent on the drug (NIDA, 2016). As people get addicted to heroin or other painkillers they become more likely to overdose. Overdoses can be reversed depending on the severity of the overdose, if paramedics can get there in time. Sadly, in most cases, it is too late and there is nothing they can do. Commonly a family  member finds their loved one diseased. Opioid addiction is unfortunately still growing in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for making sure drugs are safe and effective for their intended use (Shi, Singh, p. 118). The FDA has created very strict laws to attempt to control access to prescription medications (Shi, Singh, p.118). Yet, 140 people die every day from opioid drug related overdoses. From 1990 to 2010 the United States has written 210 million pain med prescriptions (Kardaras, 2017). Doctors are only 20 percent responsible for the opioid crisis (Fry, 2017). The United States is not the only country who is suffering from the opioid epidemic. The opioid crisis is a worldwide dilemma. The U.S. has yet to make an improvement in the opioid epidemic, however about seven countries have been able to decrease the number of deaths caused by drug overdoses. Rather than increasing prices of methadone clinics, these countries have reduced the costs for individuals needing methadone treatment (Anderson, 2017). Australia, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Norway, Greece, and Italy have all made major progress in the ending the opioid epidemic. They created good access to opioid substitution therapy at pharmacies and doc tors’ offices instead of methadone clinics (Anderson, 2017). Opioid substitution therapy is practically free to addicts in six out of the seven countries (Anderson, 2017). At opioid substitution therapy clinics, there is little to no wait times, and  patients are not denied services if their urine test positive for other drugs (Anderson, 2017). Furthermore, some of these countries have also opened DCRs or drug consumption rooms. Safe injection facilities have made a huge dent in saving people’s lives. Germany alone has opened 24 DCRs. Some countries have also opened heroin assisted treatment facilities and take home naloxone programs for people struggling with addiction. All seven countries have reduced  the number of overdose deaths by over 40 percent (Anderson, 2017). The opioid crisis in the U.S. needs to be treated as a global health issue instead of a crime. Treatment for addicts should  be a priority not a punishment. I propose that the United States starts taking some notes on what those seven countries have accomplished. Yes, it seems absurd to allow access to heroin and doctor monitored drug consumption. The United States should open free methadone treatment clinic, open opioid substitution therapy clinics, maybe even heroin assisted treatment facilities. The United States currently has zero of those facilities. Obviously, rehabilitation retreats and facilities are not  putting an end to this epidemic. If you keep telling a “child” no they can’t,  or no you cannot have that. All that “child” is going to do is keep breaking the rules. When first responders  provide  Narcan a drug that is an opioid blocker, this drug brings people back to life even after an almost fatal overdose (Kardaras , 2017). “But just as we can't arrest our way out of the opioid epidemic, we can't Narcan our way out of it either” (Kardaras, 2017).    References Kenneth Anderson, April Smith / The Fix. (n.d.). 7 Countries That Beat an Overdose Crisis. Retrieved November 10, 2017, from https://www.alternet.org/drugs/7-countries-beat-overdose-crisis Abuse, N. I. (n.d.). Opioids. Retrieved November 10, 2017, from https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/opioids Who Americans Blame Most For The Opioid Epidemic. (n.d.). Retrieved November 10, 2017, from http://fortune.com/2017/06/21/opioid-epidemic-blame-doctors/  Kardaras, D. N. (2017, August 11). To fix the opioid epidemic, we must address the causes. Retrieved November 10, 2017, from http://www.nydailynews.com/opinion/fix-opioid-epidemic-address-article-1.3404116 Shi, L., & Singh, D. A. (2017).  Essentials of the U.S. health care system  (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning. p.118.
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks