Reports

318 pages
5 views

ON WRITING REVIEW ARTICLES AND CONSTRUCTING FIELDS OF STUDY

of 318
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Share
Description
ON WRITING REVIEW ARTICLES AND CONSTRUCTING FIELDS OF STUDY
Transcript
    ON WRITING REVIEW ARTICLES AND CONSTRUCTING FIELDS OF STUDY Olga Restrepo Forero   PhD in Sociology Department of Sociology University of York 2003   Abstract This thesis develops arguments relevant to scientific writing, the understanding of genres in scientific writing, and the construction of scientific fields. It is concerned with how review articles construct the fields of study which they describe. Using constructivist and relativist perspectives from the sociology of scientific knowledge, the research is based on a textual or discourse analysis, emphasizing the contingency of collective phenomena, such as scientific fields. In the first part, the co-formation of the genres of research and review writing is addressed; the focus is on how review writing has been portrayed by historians and rhetorical analysts, bibliographers and information analysts, compilers of guidelines on scientific writing and by scientists, editors, and reviewers. Other central questions include who is expected or authorized to write reviews, as well as to what extent reviews are considered to be a discrete genre in the production of scientific knowledge; it is argued that in practical circumstances (i.e., when classifying research articles and reviews, producing guidelines on reviewing, or awarding scientific reviewing) the straightforward differentiation of two distinct forms of writing becomes blurry. In the second part, the construction of the field of Darwin Studies is examined, through the analysis of various reviews proclaiming the constitution of the field and aiming to put it in order. This ordering is produced through the establishing of boundaries with other fields; mapping it in a comprehensive manner, that is, providing criteria of inclusion and exclusion; building a biography for the field, thus identifying its srcins and development through time; and through defining the “state of the art”, which includes introducing its central figures, research problems, and ongoing controversies. The production of each construction of the field as an inter-subjective definition of a given entity, and not as a prejudiced or idiosyncratic representation, requires the careful management of the identity, authority, and credibility of the reviewer. The successful negotiation of a relatively stable constitution of a field is produced through inter-textual reiteration and reinterpretation. 2  Table of Contents Abstract.....................................................................................................................2   Table of Contents.....................................................................................................3   Acknowledgements...................................................................................................6   Introducing: On writing a dissertation on writing review articles and constructing fields of study......................................................................................8    First point. The proto-history of my research project............................................8   Second point. The sequence of events. Using the literature for one’s own ends (as Latour and Woolgar have shown to be the case)...........................................11   Third point. Defining and justifying the scope of the study.................................20    Fourth point. What I have just done is no different from what reviews do in defining the borders of the fields they constitute..................................................26     Fifth point. Contesting the clear-cut distinction between reviews and other types of scientific texts while managing not to dissolve my research question.............31   Sixth point. I am not sure whether they said exactly this. In any case, I still have to write (defend) my dissertation and, according to the usual definition, I will have to claim (no choice here) that I have been able to create some (let me put it this way) srcinal product…................................................................................34   Part one: Reviews constructed and deconstructed as a genre of scientific literature..................................................................................................................35   Chapter 1 Scientists, authors and reporters: A mélange of histories about writing science........................................................................................................36   The history of the research paper and the fabrication of a genre........................37     Histories of learned journalism and the co-formation of two genres..................48    Reviewers, compilers, editors and their struggles for authority..........................55    An exemplar in the formation of the genre of reviewing......................................62   Chapter 2 Ready to review but not for reviewing? Writing reviews with some help from manuals..................................................................................................73   Chapter 3 Detecting and classifying reviews: Analysts’ approaches to the review literature.....................................................................................................94    Identifying and counting the review literature...................................................104   Classifying reviews, reviewers and audiences...................................................109   Chapter 4 Awards for Scientific Reviewing: Damned with faint prize?.........117    Awarding Scientific Reviewing: Setting the standards......................................119  3   Rating reviews (with a little help from Garfield)...............................................123    Fitting in the mould for reviews.........................................................................130    Damned with faint prize?...................................................................................133   Part two: Reading (my collection of) reviews on Darwin studies....................141   Chapter 5 My reviews introduced as published texts.......................................142   Selecting reviews on Darwin and Darwinism....................................................142    Preludes to reading............................................................................................147     Reviews: descriptive or constitutive?.................................................................158   Chapter 6 Mapping the field and managing completeness..............................161    A window into the text........................................................................................162   ‘In this paper we review…’................................................................................165    Reducing scope, gaining completeness..............................................................168   Counting citations and identifying the shape of the field...................................176     Reviews and boundary-work..............................................................................181   Chapter 7 Telling stories about a field variously described (Darwin studies or the Darwin industry)............................................................................................185    From the point of view of the present.................................................................186    Why call the field the Darwin Industry?............................................................193   Was there a Darwin community in 1959?..........................................................201   The trinary field of Darwin studies....................................................................208   Chapter 8 Ordering the field of Darwin studies: Social accounting and consensus-making.................................................................................................218    Accounting for controversies in writing and reviewing.....................................219   Whig scientists, external intellectuals and internal historians..........................227     Attempting ‘closure’ and dissenting about consensus.......................................237    Constituting a centre and marginalizing its margins.........................................243   Chapter 9 Intertextuality, srcinality and the rhetorical stance of reviewing253    Authorities, personae and self authorization.....................................................253    Authoring reviews and managing intertextuality...............................................263   Concluding: (My collection of) Reviews: Descriptive or constitutive?............279   Appendix 1 Consulted Reviews...........................................................................285  4  Appendix 2 Selected reviews: Details provided on Authors and information on publishing journals...............................................................................................292   Appendix 3 Selected reviews: Managing Completeness in the introductory sections..................................................................................................................294   References.............................................................................................................299  5
Related Documents
View more...
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks
SAVE OUR EARTH

We need your sign to support Project to invent "SMART AND CONTROLLABLE REFLECTIVE BALLOONS" to cover the Sun and Save Our Earth.

More details...

Sign Now!

We are very appreciated for your Prompt Action!

x