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A CASE STUDY ON STREET DESIGN SONYA FAMBRO 12.12.13 ADVISOR R. DAGENHART CONTENT INTRODUCTION 4 HISTORY 6-10 ISSUES WITH STREET DESIGN 11-12 EVERYDAY URBANISM 13 EVERYDAY URBANISM CASE STUDIES 14-18 GREEN STREETS 19 GREEN STREET CASE STUDIES 20-21 COMPLETE STREETS 22-23 COMPLETE STREET CASE STUDIES 24-26 CONCLUSION 27-30 REFERENCES 32-33 02 | Studio Name | Project Name http://wallpapersus.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/City-Streets.jpg
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  SONYA FAMBRO 12.12.13 ADVISOR R. DAGENHART A CASE STUDY ON STREET DESIGN  02 | Studio Name | Project Name CONTENT INTRODUCTION 4HISTORY 6-10ISSUES WITH STREET DESIGN 11-12EVERYDAY URBANISM 13EVERYDAY URBANISM CASE STUDIES 14-18GREEN STREETS 19GREEN STREET CASE STUDIES 20-21COMPLETE STREETS 22-23COMPLETE STREET CASE STUDIES 24-26CONCLUSION 27-30REFERENCES 32-33  Project Name | Studio Name | 03 http://wallpapersus.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/City-Streets.jpg  04 | Studio Name | Project Name Introduction Atlanta is one of the fastest growing cities in the South and like many other cities has experienced a cultural change in perception of the role of cities and urban spaces. With the rejection of suburban sprawl and the recent migration of people into the city, Atlan-ta is having a problem common to many urban cores throughout the nation, their streets are no longer an-swering the needs of their populace. Streets in Atlanta have long been the realm of the automobile. Whereas, this was an acceptable reality in the twentieth century it is no longer the case now. Streets and public right-of-ways in Atlanta account for 25% of the urban land.  They present an incredible opportunity to address a wide range of urban problems but are being severely underutilized in their current state. Historically streets have been designed by engineers whose main goal was to move traffic as quickly as pos-sible, little attention was given to “attracting people to linger in shared public space.” 1  Over the years how-ever, the relationship between people and their streets have changed drastically. Urban designers like Allen Jacobs and writers like Jane Jacobs have introduced ground breaking concepts of the proper relationship between people, streets, and their design. No longer are streets mere “public utilities” 2  whose main goal is to facilitate movement from one place to another. Now the way we define our streets have become more com-plex, more interactive. Urban streets today are seen as a place of social and commercial encounter and ex-change. They are “places of movement, places where personal and political life flow together, and they ex-clude no one.” 3  With the work of Allen Jacobs, Jane Jacobs, and others the definition of a street went from being functionally driven to one that is both functional and social. With this new definition came an under-standing of how streets should be designed. From Paul Zucker’s Town and Square to Gordon Cullen’s Townscape, urban designers and architects have attempted to recon-cile the new definition of a street with its design. Recent urban theories on street design suggest that the answer to designing a good street lies in the exploitation of one or more of the multiple functions a street can provide. For example, Green Street designs incorporate sustain-able infrastructure into its street design while, Complete Streets suggest that roads should function for all its users, not only vehicular traffic. These theories demonstrate the new conversations people are having about their space, urbanism, and development. The auto-centric view is no longer one that people are accepting in their urban environment, these theories provide Atlanta with a pos-sible framework it could use in the redevelopment of its city and streets. However, there is no clear explanation in how we might design for these multifaceted, complex, and dynamic relationships.  This paper will look at several contemporary theories of street design in order to get a better understanding of how streets in Atlanta could be redesigned and repur-posed with the understanding of streets as being “sym-bolic, ceremonial, social, and political places [Jacobs 5].” I will begin first by analyzing the history of the street as it was established throughout ancient Rome, 15th century Renaissance, the Medieval era, Baroque, New York in the 1900s, and modern day suburbia in order to give context to the theoretical ideas that are currently being applied.  Then I will look at some of the issues in the design of streets, in order to understand why streets are so difficult to design. Finally, I will analyze each theory through the use of case studies in order to understand how they dealt with and overcame the issues of street design and how these theories might be applicable to Atlanta.
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