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Flute Syllabus 2017-18

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syllabus 2017-2018
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    in collaboration with Practical Examination Requirements Syllabus for FLUTE General Notes of Guidance  pages 1-6 Diploma in Music Performance Year 1  page 7   Diploma in Music Performance Year 2 Undergraduate Level 4  page 8 Diploma in Music Performance Year 3 Undergraduate Level 5  page 9  BMus 3 Undergraduate Level 6  page 11 BMus 4 Undergraduate Level 6 (Graduation Level)  page 13 Flute 2017-2018  Practical Examination Requirements Syllabus for Flute 2017-18 General Notes of Guidance This syllabus provides details of practical examination requirements for the academic year from July 2017 to May 2018. Syllabuses are updated each year and placed on the Blackboard, so make sure that you use this syllabus for the coming year only. Students are required to keep their diaries free for the following practical examination periods: There are three types of Principal Study exam: (1) Technical Exams; (2) Repertoire Exams; (3) Recital Exams.  Additionally, students following a Second Study or a Related Study are usually assessed in a single exam combining technical and repertoire elements. These exams are described, level by level, in this syllabus.   The level of achievement that you are expected to demonstrate rises as you move through each year of your programme. Broadly speaking, examiners will be working to these expectations: Year of Study Level Expectation of Performance at this Level Diploma Year 1 Foundation Basic competence in skills and communication Diploma Year 2 (BMus Year 1) Level 4 Fundamental competence in skills and communication Diploma Year 3 (BMus Year 2) Level 5 Demonstrable security in skills and communication BMus Year 3 Level 6 Assured command of skills and communication BMus Year 4 Graduation Level Individual flair in skills and communication (1) Technical Exams These test a range of technical skills (scales, arpeggios, studies, sight reading or quick studies, orchestral excerpts) and are short exams. This syllabus outlines the requirements for these. Content/Procedure:  All technical exams operate in a similar way. The examiners will choose what they want to hear you perform from amongst the full list of material, set out in this syllabus, all of which you should have prepared (if you are a string player being assessed for Dip 1 and Dip 2 (Undergraduate Level 4), please note that you will need to write out and present to the examiners a list of the technical work you are offering). The timing given in this syllabus tells you, and the examiners, how long they should take over testing you: a selection of material only is covered as it would generally be impossible to hear everything listed in the time indicated. Examiners: technical exam panels comprise two examiners. One acts as Chair and will sit on a range of technical exams within your study area. The Chair may, or may not, be a specialist for your Practical Examination Dates Semester 1: 27 Nov – 1 Dec 2017 Diploma Technical Examinations Semester 1: 27 Nov – 1 Dec 2017 BMus 3 Technical Examinations (Piano & Chinese instruments) Semester 2: 26 – 27 Feb 2018 BMus 3 Technical Exam (Orchestral studies) Semester 2: 13 – 14 March 2018 BMus 4 Orchestral Repertoire/Mock Audition Examinations Semester 2: 30 Apr – 5 May 2018 Diploma Repertoire & Recital Examinations Semester 2: 5 – 11 May 2018 BMus Repertoire & Recital Examinations 1  instrument; the second examiner will be a specialist of the instrument examined (though the Department of Music reserves the right to deviate from this pattern in emergency situations). Assessment Criteria: you will be assessed in the following areas: ã   Accuracy and Fluency (e.g. facility, evenness, consistency) ã   Presentation (e.g. posture, projection, communication) ã   Control of Instrument (e.g. articulation, coordination, breathing, intonation) ã   Musical Awareness (e.g. style, energy, confidence) ã   Conception of Sound (e.g. musical intention, personal voice, tone quality) (2) Repertoire Exams (taken by Diploma Year 1 and 2 students only) Content/Procedure:  In Principal Study Diploma repertoire exams and in all non-Principal Study repertoire exams, you should prepare an amount of music corresponding to the time indicated in the syllabus. However, the time indicated is also the length of the examination: you should therefore be ready for the fact that your examiners may select at the beginning of the exam those elements from your complete programme which they wish to hear you perform. Alternatively, they may stop you at suitable points in mid-movement in some or all of your pieces, in order to complete the exam within the time stated. The examiners will tell you at each stage what they want you to perform. Repertoire exams are usually conducted in one of the teaching rooms in College. Examiners: repertoire exam panels comprise two examiners, normally the Head of Study as Chair and a specialist of the instrument examined (though the Department of Music reserves the right to deviate from this pattern in emergency situations). Assessment Criteria: you will be assessed in the following areas:   ã   Musical Creativity (e.g. imagination, innovation, spontaneity, individuality) ã   Accuracy and Fluency (e.g. facility, consistency) ã   Presentation (e.g. posture, projection, communication) ã   Control of Instrument (e.g. articulation, coordination, breathing, intonation) ã   Musical Awareness (e.g. style, energy, confidence) ã   Conception of Sound (e.g. musical intention, personal voice, tone quality) (3) Recital Exams (taken by Diploma, BMus3 and BMus4 undergraduates) Content/Procedure:  the Recital Exam is the form of Principal Study examination used in Diploma, BMus 3 and 4. It is a concert, performed in full in a performance venue and without the examiners directing proceedings. Programmes should be planned to fit comfortably within the stated time range and timings should allow for reasonable gaps between movements and pieces, for any stage adjustments that may be required and (where permitted) for any interval built into the recital. Recital Exams are conducted by a panel of three people. For some faculties, the panel normally consists of a generalist Chair, the Head of Study as a broad ‘faculty specialist’ (or Head of Study substitute) and an external specialist specific to the instrument being examined. For other study areas, the pattern is normally for the Head of Study to function as Chair, an external ‘faculty specialist’ to be engaged and the third panel member to be an internal specialist. In recitals, a student may come before a panel that includes their current teacher. Where this occurs, either the Head or Deputy Head, Department of Music may attend the recital as an internal moderator. Where a student is taught by a team of teachers, this situation shall apply only to his or her principal teacher. 2  Examiners are asked to ignore all prior knowledge of a student’s work, character, and personal circumstances while they are making their assessment. The assessment relates only to what has been heard in the exam. It is the student’s responsibility to inform his/her Head of Study in advance if a panel has been arranged with a former teacher whose presence they feel would make them uncomfortable. If the panel cannot be re-arranged, the Head or Deputy Head, Department of Music may attend the recital to exercise internal moderation. For other practical exams, the Head of Study or a specifically delegated deputy may attend those exams that are affected so as to monitor the impartiality of the proceedings. Exams will often be attended by External Examiner (as distinct from the external specialist panel member described above), not only for monitoring but, where appropriate, for moderation. Assessment Criteria: you will be assessed using the criteria outlined in section (2) above for Repertoire exams. Reports:  report forms are divided into two sections. The first, on the front, is a brief summary of the student’s overall standard of performance. Here attention is paid to match the comments to the mark awarded and to the assessment criteria. The longer section, on the back of the form, usually written by a specialist, is for technical feedback offering specific comments on the individual works heard.  Students preparing recitals need to read carefully through the following guidelines PLANNING YOUR RECITAL (1) Recital Content : when planning your Recital, you should ensure that your programme meets syllabus requirements, presents a balanced programme and that your timings are realistic. The issue of examination length is critical for you, for your examiners and for the smooth running of the examinations process, so penalties are applied to recitals that under run or overrun (see below). Timings should be based on your own performance and not taken from CDs. Recital examinations should normally include no more than 12 additional players. Permission to exceed this size of ensemble should be sought from your Head of Study. It is your responsibility to ensure that all performers are available at the scheduled time for an exam. If you or your accompanist/fellow performers fail to appear at this time, the exam is deemed to have been missed.   You should discuss your programme content with your Principal Study teacher, and it is recommended that your programme is also approved by your Head of Study. This is particularly relevant if you have resource requests other than a grand piano (see the next section). (2) The Instrument and Resource Request form : All students who require additional instruments (e.g. harpsichord, prepared piano), music hire, or sound equipment/support need to complete the Instrument and Resource Request form and return this to the Music Office post-box by the deadline advertised. This form can be requested through the Music office. The Department of Music aims to accommodate the requests that students make through this form but cannot guarantee to do so. Students may need to meet the cost of requests involving additional financial outlay and should check any such financial implications of the repertoire proposals they have with their Head of Study before finalising their programme and submitting this form. The completed form should also include the names of other students performing in your recital. If they also have a recital in that examination period we will attempt to schedule them separate from each other but, due to constraints, cannot always guarantee this will be possible. If your proposed programme has implications for scheduling your recital to a particular venue, this needs to be drawn to the attention of the Music Office. Venues, however, are allocated according to instrument group and not to individual student. 3
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