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Feasting metals and the ideology of power in the Late Bronze Age of Atlantic Iberia

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This paper deals with feasts during the Late Bronze Age in the Atlantic area of the Iberian Peninsula and their relations with forms of power and social inequality. This was a period of intense transformations, in which ideological manipulation
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  is pdf of your paper in Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner   belongs to the publishers Oxbow Books and it is their copyright. As author you are licenced to make up to 50 offprints from it, but beyond that you may not publish it on the World Wide  Web until three years from publication (August 2014), unless the site is a limited access intranet (password protected). If you have queries about this please contact the editorial department at Oxbow Books (editorial@oxbowbooks.com).   An offprint from GUESS WHO’S COMING TO DINNER  FEASTING RITUALS IN THE PREHISTORIC SOCIETIES OF EUROPE AND THE NEAR EAST Gonzalo Aranda Jiménez Sandra Montón-Subías  Margarita Sánchez Romero Prologue by Ferran Adrià  © OXBOW BOOKS ISBN 978-1-84217-985-7  CONTENTS List of Contributors ...............................................................................................viiPrologue ..................................................................................................................ix  Ferran Adrià   1.  Appetite Comes With Eating  : An Overview of the Social Meaning of Ritual Food and Drink Consumption ...........................................................1 Gonzalo Aranda Jiménez, Sandra Montón-Subías, Margarita Sánchez Romeroand Eva Alarcón García   2. Commensality Rituals: Feeding Identities in Prehistory .....................................8  Margarita Sánchez Romero  3. Feasting and Social Dynamics in the Epipaleolithic of the Fertile Crescent: An Interpretive Exercise ..............................................30 Brian Hayden  4. Evolving Human/Animal Interactions in the Near Eastern Neolithic: Feasting as a Case Study ..................................................................................64 Nigel Goring-Morris and Anna Belfer-Cohen  5. Feeding Stonehenge: Feasting in Late Neolithic Britain ...................................73  Mike Parker Pearson, Joshua Pollard, Colin Richards, Julian omas, Kate Welham, Umberto Albarella, Ben Chan, Peter Marshall and Sarah Viner 6. Political Cuisine: Rituals of Commensality in the Neolithic and Bronze Age Aegean ..........................................................91 Paul Halstead and Valasia Isaakidou  7. Drinking and Eating Together: e Social and Symbolic Context of Commensality Rituals in the Bell Beakers of the Interior of Iberia (2500–2000 cal BC) .....................................................................................109 Rafael Garrido-Pena, Manuel A. Rojo-Guerra, Iñigo García-Martínez de Lagrán and Cristina Tejedor-Rodríguez   8. Feasting Death: Funerary Rituals in the Bronze Age Societies of South-Eastern Iberia ..................................................................................130 Gonzalo Aranda Jiménez and Sandra Montón-Subías   9. Feasting Metals and the Ideology of Power in the Late Bronze Age of Atlantic Iberia ...........................................................................................158  Xosé-Lois Armada   10. Representing Communities in Heterogeneous Worlds: Staple Foodsand Ritual Practices in the Phoenician Diaspora ............................................184  Ana Delgado and Meritxell Ferrer  11. Consumption Relations in the Northern Iberian Household .........................204 Ramon Buxó and Jordi Principal  12. e Archaeological Identification of Feasts and Banquets: eoretical Notes and the Case of Mas Castellar ............................................224 Lluís Garcia and Enriqueta Pons   9FEASTING METALS AND THE IDEOLOGY OF POWER IN THE LATE BRONZE AGE OF  ATLANTIC IBERIA   Xosé-Lois Armada  Introduction e paper I presented at the Granada meeting, from which this book arose, used in its title the phrase e Times ey Are a-changin’  , from a well-known Bob Dylan song. My aim was to suggest two changes. On the one hand, the bursting onto the scene of commensality as a topic of discussion in the field of archaeology, of which this and other recently published books are good examples (Sardà 2010), and on the other, the setting for major socioeconomic changes on the Atlantic façade during the Late Bronze Age, the period I dealt with in my talk.During this period of change ( c.  1300–850 cal BC), to which I will refer later, we find various metal objects linked to commensality rituals; for the western part of the Iberian Peninsula these are currently the earliest recurrent evidence of this type of practice. However, there is occasional evidence from earlier periods, such as at the settlement of Carrascal (Oeiras), where the sacrifice and communal eating of bovines in the Chalcolithic period is documented (Cardoso 2009). ere is also increasing evidence of the consumption of beer and other psychoactive substances in European prehistory from Neolithic times onwards (Dietler 2006, 232–35; Guerra 2006; Rojo et al.  2006), and the west of the Iberian Peninsula is no exception. It is obvious, therefore, that this subject should be looked at from a long-term perspective; this is also true of the fact that the appearance of these objects in the Late Bronze Age implies a major transformation in the material nature of the banquet and, therefore, in its visual and scenographic dimensions.e cauldrons, flesh-hooks and rotary spits of the Late Bronze Age are excellent examples of how the interpretation of objects is subject to theoretical changes in the discipline. e first recognisable find of a cauldron on the Iberian Peninsula was at Cabárceno (Penagos, Santander) in 1912, although it was not published until almost three decades later (García y Bellido 1941). at article speaks of the similarity to finds made in the British Isles and suggests a connection with religious ceremonies (García y Bellido 1941, 561). e flesh-hooks and rotary spits that began to appear in Spain
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