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AST Matrix for Elite Athletic Performance and Brain Injuries

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Advanced Simulation TherapyTM is a cutting-edge, non-invasive, non-pharmaceutical alternative delivering positive benefits via a sports performance evaluation, rehabilitation and training matrix (AST MatrixTM). ASTTM optimizes elite athletic
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    1 17470 N Pacesetter Way, Scottsdale, AZ 85255 l Info@ASTMatrix.org l 480.305.2087 Changing the GAME! – Teams and players who enter the AST Matrix will simply perform better than the competition. Performance Research Sciences can provide the AST Matrix protocol to professional athletic organizations annually with an AST Matrix Elite Athletic Performance Services Agreement. This scope of service provides the organization with an on-site AST Unit montage with Board Certified AST Technicians on a seasonal basis. All players who enter the matrix are given a benchmark analysis and assigned an AST Performance Rating which is monitored through weekly sessions as they matriculate through the AST Progression Protocols. On an individual player level neurophysiological positive outcomes include improvements in neuromuscular function, improved autonomic nervous system response and reaction time, numerous biological and physiological improvements and optimal brainwave balance. For players suffering from traumatic brain injuries and other sports injuries positive outcomes include decreased recovery times, quantitative assessments, evaluation and training for returning to play with improved quality of care. On an organizational level the AST Matrix can be used as a sports performance screening tool in the decision process to observe existing neurological bio-markers, to predict player performance and for making player selections as well as assessing player longevity, risk management and liability. Advanced Simulation Therapy TM   is a cutting-edge, non-invasive, non-pharmaceutical alternative delivering positive benefits via a sports performance evaluation, rehabilitation and training matrix (AST Matrix  TM ). AST  TM  optimizes elite athletic performance as well as active daily lifestyles to address injury recovery by providing a low to high variable impact rehabilitation/training protocols in response to traumatic brain injuries (TBI’s) and various sports related injuries by decreasing recovery times, reducing liability and improving the quality of care from baseline. AST uses a multi-step method for benchmark evaluation, training and rehabilitation that includes an individual data observation and data collection assessment, a neurofeedback and biofeedback analysis of the brain and body as well as a variable impact rehabilitation and/or training protocol. Following which a training regimen is initiated and continued on a regular or select basis dependent on the performance goals of the athlete or individual. Relative to elite athletic performance, AST can provide positive outcomes for optimizing brain and body functions, recovery from concussions (mTBI’s), traumatic brain injuries (TBI’s), neuromuscular injuries, depression, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) or dementia pugilistica (DP), a form of encephalopathy that is a progressive degenerative disease in individuals with a history of multiple concussions and other forms of head injury. CTE has been most commonly found in professional athletes participating in American football, ice hockey, professional wrestling and other contact sports who have experienced repetitive brain trauma. It has also been found in soldiers exposed to a blast or a concussive injury 1  in both cases resulting in characteristic degeneration of brain tissue and the accumulation of tau protein. Individuals with TBI’s may show symptoms of dementia, such as memory loss, aggression, confusion and depression, which generally appear years or many decades after the trauma. 2,3,4,5  Repeated concussions and injuries less serious than concussions ("sub-concussions") incurred during the play of contact sports over a long period can result in CTE. For more information contact Dr. Southland at 480.278.6609 Dr.Southland@ASTMatrix.org     2 AST Matrix TM  Proprietary Progression Protocol for Recovery, Rehabilitation and Optimal Performance   Baseline (Step 0):  As the baseline step of the Return to Normal Daily Activities Progression, the athlete/patient needs to have completed physical and cognitive rest and not be experiencing concussion symptoms for a minimum of 24 hours. Benchmark Analysis (Data Observation and Deviation Reference Points)  The Goal: Neurofeedback & Biofeedback Analysis, Brain Mapping, Brainwave Assessment & Evaluation  The Time: 60 to 120 minutes.  The Activities: LORETA QEEG, BCN, BCB, AST. Absolutely no cognitive tasking or ATFTM (Active Tactile Feedback). Step 1:  Rest/Relaxed BCN, BCB  The Goal: Mitigate heart rate, mitigate ANS, HRV, GSR.  The Time: 30 to 90 minutes.  The Activities: Passive Brainwave Optimization (EO, EC). Step 2:  Low Impact Rehabilitation/Training Protocol  The Goal: Limited head and body movement  The Time: 60 to 90 minutes.  The Activities: Rest/Relaxed Passive Optimization (EO, EC), Low Impact Active Tasking with AST. This stage engages light; Interactive Tasking Protocols, Cognitive Functions, ANS Response, Neuromuscular Function and Active Tactile Feedback. Step 3:  Moderate Impact Rehabilitation/Training Protocol  The Goal: Return to Active Daily Lifestyle/Return to Practice in Controlled Environment  The Time: 60 to 90 minutes.  The Activities: Rest/Relaxed Passive Optimization (EO, EC), Moderate Impact Active Tasking with AST. This stage engages more intense; Interactive Tasking Protocols, Cognitive Functions, ANS Response, Neuromuscular Function and Active Tactile Feedback in addition to the components introduced in Step 2. Step 4:  High Impact Rehabilitation/Training Protocol  The Goal: Return to Active Daily Lifestyle/Return to Practice in Controlled Environment  The Time: 90 minutes. For more information contact Dr. Southland at 480.278.6609 Dr.Southland@ASTMatrix.org     3  The Activities: Rest/Relaxed Passive Optimization (EO, EC), High Impact Active Tasking with AST. This stage engages more intense; Interactive Tasking Protocols, Cognitive Functions, ANS Response, Neuromuscular Function and Active Tactile Feedback in addition to the components introduced in Step 3. Step 5:  Optimized Training Protocol  The Goal: Normal Active Daily Lifestyle in Open Environment/Normal Play in Open Competition  The Time: 90 to 120 minutes.  The Activities: Rest/Relaxed Passive Optimization (EO, EC), High Impact Active Tasking with AST. This stage engages more intense; Interactive Tasking Protocols, Cognitive Functions, ANS Response, Neuromuscular Function and Active Tactile Feedback in addition to the components introduced in Step 4. Note:  At any time an athlete/patient should display retrograde progress return to the previous step. Additionally, should an athlete/patient sustain a recurring injury or debilitation return to Step 0 and re-evaluate. It is important to monitor symptoms and cognitive function carefully during each increase of exertion. Athletes should only progress to the next level of exertion if they are not experiencing symptoms at the current level. If symptoms return at any step, an athlete should stop these activities as this may be a sign the athlete is pushing too hard. Only after additional rest, when the athlete is once again not experiencing symptoms for a minimum of 24 hours, should he or she start again at the previous step during which symptoms were experienced. Advanced Simulation Therapy TM  can directly impact a national concern by improving the quality of care in organized team sports and professional athletic franchises. According to the CDC, National TBI Estimates reveal that every year, at least 1.7 million TBIs occur either as an isolated injury or along with other injuries. 6  TBI is a contributing factor to a third (30.5%) of all injury-related deaths in the United States. 6 About 75% of TBIs that occur each year are concussions or other forms of mild TBI. 7  Children aged 0 to 4 years, older adolescents aged 15 to 19 years, and adults aged 65 years and older are most likely to sustain a TBI. Almost half a million (473,947) emergency department visits for TBI are made annually by children aged 0 to 14 years. Adults aged 75 years and older have the highest rates of TBI-related hospitalization and death. 6  Furthermore, direct medical costs and indirect costs such as lost productivity of TBI totaled an estimated $76.5 billion in the United States in 2000. 8,9   Documented Research Data on  Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) from participation in sports and recreation activities have received increased public awareness, with many states and the federal government considering or implementing laws directing the response to suspected brain injury. 10,11  Whereas public health programs promote the many benefits of sports and recreation activities, those benefits are tempered by the risk for injury. During 2001-2005, an estimated 207,830 emergency department (ED) visits for concussions and other  TBIs related to sports and recreation activities were reported annually, with 65% of TBIs occurring among children aged 5-18 years. 12  Compared with adults, younger persons are at increased risk for TBIs with increased severity and prolonged recovery. 13  An estimated 1 73,285 persons aged ≤19 years were treated in EDs annually for nonfatal TBIs related to sports and recreation activities. From 2001 to 2009, the number of annual TBI-related ED visits increased significantly, from 153,375 to 248,418, with the highest rates among males aged 10--19 years. By increasing awareness of TBI risks from sports and recreation, employing proper technique and protective equipment, and quickly responding to injuries, the incidence, severity, and long-term negative health effects of  TBIs among children and adolescents can be reduced. For more information contact Dr. Southland at 480.278.6609 Dr.Southland@ASTMatrix.org     4 During 2001- 2009, an estimated 2,651,581 children aged ≤19 years were treated annually for sports and recreation--related injuries. Approximately 6.5%, or 173,285 of these injuries, were TBIs. Approximately 71.0% of all sports and recreation-related TBI ED visits were among males; 70.5% were among persons aged 10-19 years. An estimated 2.5% of children and adolescents with sports and recreation-related injuries were hospitalized or transferred to other facilities, compared with an estimated 6.6% of those with sports and recreation-related TBIs. From 2001 to 2009, the estimated number of sports and recreation-related TBI visits to EDs increased 62%, from 153,375 to 248,418, and the estimated rate of TBI visits increased 57%, from 190 per 100,000 population to 298. During this same period, the estimated number of ED visits for TBIs that resulted in hospitalization ranged from 9,300 to 14,000 annually. Overall, the activities associated with the greatest estimated number of TBI-related ED visits were bicycling, football, playground activities, basketball, and soccer. Activities for which TBI accounted for >10% of the injury ED visits for that activity included horseback riding (15.3%), ice skating (11.4%), golfing (11.0%), all-terrain vehicle riding (10.6%), and tobogganing/sledding (10.2%). Activities associated with the greatest estimated number of sports and recreation- related TBI ED visits varied by age group and sex. For males and females aged ≤9 years,  TBIs most commonly occurred during playground activities or when bicycling. For persons aged 10-19 years, males sustained TBIs most often while playing football or bicycling, whereas females sustained TBIs most often while playing soccer or basketball, or while bicycling. 14  Rates of sports and recreation-related TBI visits among persons aged 10-19 years are much higher than among younger persons which may be associated with age-related increases in participation in higher-risk activities (e.g., competitive contact sports) or increases in participants' weight and speed, leading to greater momentum and force of impact. 15  Risk for TBI is inherent to physical activity and can occur during any activity at any age. To minimize TBI in sports and recreation activities, primary and secondary prevention strategies should be implemented. Primary prevention strategies include: 1) using protective equipment (e.g., a bicycle helmet) that is appropriate for the activity or position, fits correctly, is well maintained, and is used consistently and correctly; 2) coaching appropriate sport-specific skills with an emphasis on safe practices and proper technique; 3) adhering to rules of play with good sportsmanship and strict officiating; and 4) attention to strength and conditioning. 16  Secondary prevention strategies include increasing awareness of the signs and symptoms of TBI and recognizing and responding quickly and appropriately to suspected TBI. Participants suspected of having a TBI should be removed from play, never returned to play the same day, and allowed to return only after evaluation and clearance by a health-care provider who is experienced in diagnosing and managing TBI. 14  Return to play is a critical decision because children and adolescents are at increased risk for both repeat concussion during sports and recreation-related activities and for long-term sequelae, delayed recovery, and cumulative consequences of multiple TBIs (e.g., increased severity of future  TBIs and increased risk for depression and dementia). 17,18  Additionally, the CDC findings are subject to at least five limitations which have strong implications that the data observed is only a small percentage of the real life occurrences of traumatic brain injuries in America. First, injury rates for specific activities could not be calculated because of a lack of national participation and exposure data. Therefore, the estimates cannot be used to calculate the relative risks for TBI associated with any particular sport or activity. Second, only injuries recorded by hospital EDs were included and excluded persons who sought care in other settings or who did not seek care. Therefore, current data reported For more information contact Dr. Southland at 480.278.6609 Dr.Southland@ASTMatrix.org     5 underestimates the actual burden of TBI from sports and recreation among children and adolescents. Third, only the principal diagnosis and primary body part injured were included and therefore cannot capture TBIs that were secondary diagnoses. For example, skull fractures, which commonly involve TBI, are listed as fractures of the head, and not as TBIs, resulting in underestimation of the number of sports and recreation-related TBI ED visits. Fourth, narrative descriptions do not provide detailed information about injury circumstances (e.g., whether the activity was organized, whether the injury occurred during training or competition, or whether protective equipment was used). Finally, the available data do not allow for assessment of whether the increased number of ED visits from 2001 to 2009 resulted from an increase in incidence or an increase in awareness of TBI and concussion, or from shifts in location of medical care, or other reasons.  The frequency of TBIs and the wide variety of activities associated with them underscore the need to prevent, recognize, and respond to sports and recreation-related TBIs. Advanced Simulation Therapy  TM  is a cost effective means that can be implemented into every organized sports program across America to reduce, mitigate and respond to the ever increasing prevalence of TBI’s. Additional AST implications for war veterans Brain injury has become the signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Because wartime TBIs can be associated with a psychological wound, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the diagnosis and treatment of service members and veterans with brain injury has become even more of a major challenge for the military and for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).  The good news is that there's been a tremendous amount of research and advocacy as a result of war-related  TBIs, and it's improving our understanding of the brain and the way we treat injuries. Today, organizations like the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) are working to improve the how we care for service members with TBI, to ratchet up research efforts, and to increase education efforts surrounding TBI. A brain injury can affect just about everything; including the way a person walks, talks, and thinks. For service members and veterans who have been in combat, these symptoms can be compounded by other physical injuries or post-traumatic stress disorder. The length of the rehabilitation process varies according to the person and to the severity of their injury. Some people may only require a few weeks or months of rehabilitation, and others may require years or even lifelong rehabilitation. Treatments range from critical hospital care to speech and language therapy. As of 2011, more than 212,000 service members sustained a TBI, many from blast injuries, the primary cause of  TBI in combat. And symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and TBI often overlap, making diagnosis and treatment more challenging. Brain injuries in Iraq or Afghanistan have triggered the most advanced medical trauma response in history. Because of this highly advanced care, survival rates are higher than in any previous wars. Once diagnosed, TBI is treated by a complex plan of medical rehabilitation, which can include a combination of rest, physical and occupational therapy, psychotherapy, and medication. 20 For more information contact Dr. Southland at 480.278.6609 Dr.Southland@ASTMatrix.org 
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